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Order of Saint Augustine

"Anima una et cor unum in Deum!" (Regula)

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Thought of Saint Augustine
O God, ever the same, may I know myself, may I know you.
(Soliloquia II, 1, 1)
In the material world, a foot is one thing, a ladder is another and wings still another. In the interior world, however, feet, ladders, and wings are the affections of a good will, with them, we walk, we climb, and we fly.
(En. in ps. 38, 2)
In the material world, a foot is one thing, a ladder is another and wings still another. In the interior world, however, feet, ladders, and wings are the affections of a good will, with them, we walk, we climb, and we fly.
(En. in ps. 38, 2)
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Ordination of the Augustinian Bishop Robert F. Prevost in Chiclayo


Chiclayo, Peru
The feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, 2014 will be a most memorable one for our former Prior General, Robert Prevost. In the presence of 24 bishops, hundreds of priests, Friars, men and women of various religious congregations, seminarians, and lay faithful, our brother Robert was ordained as a bishop...

The feast of Our Lady of Guadalupe, 2014 will be a most memorable one for our former Prior General, Robert Prevost. In the presence of 24 bishops, hundreds of priests, Friars, men and women of various religious congregations, seminarians, and lay faithful, our brother Robert was ordained as a bishop and became the fourth bishop of the diocese of Chiclayo, in Peru.

From the moment the liturgical procession began from the bishop's residence until the final procession exiting the cathedral, it was a joyous celebration. Many, many people during the procession offered a sincere and warm welcome with the words, "Bienvenido Monsignor, Roberto!" (Welcome, Bishop Robert!). The Papal Nuncio, James Patrick Green, was the presiding bishop who ordained Robert.

At the end of the celebration, the prior general, Alejandro Moral, osa offered words of congratulations and thanks to the new bishop for his service to the Order and the Church. Bishop Robert offered concluding remarks reminding all of those gathered for the celebration of our call to follow the Gospel mandate to be Missionaries to the world.

Congratulations, Bishop Robert!

The Bishop's Coat of Arms

It is a long-standing tradition in the Catholic Church that each bishop would have a “coat of arms”, or an “achievement”, composed of a shield, the motto, and the external ornaments, all of which are chosen to represent some aspect of the man who has been called to serve the Church as a bishop.

According to the customs of “ecclesiastical heraldry”, the left side of the shield (as we look at it, because it is the “right side” of the one who would be carrying the shield, the “dexter impalement”) is dedicated to the jurisdiction or territory being served by the bishop. In the case of Bishop Prevost’s coat of arms, we find a white “fleur de lis” on a blue background, representing the Blessed Virgin Mary under the title of the “Immaculate Conception”, who is the patroness of the Diocese of Chiclayo.

The right side of the shield (the “sinister impalement”) is customarily indicative of the person who is named bishop. In Bishop Prevost’s coat of arms, we find the seal of the Order of St. Augustine, clearly indicating the religious community from which the new bishop was called to serve the Diocese of Chiclayo. This is particularly significant since before being called to the episcopacy, Bishop Prevost served as Prior General of the Augustinian Order for twelve years.

Below the shield, we see the “scroll”, which carries the words chosen as Bishop Prevost’s episcopal motto. In this case, the Latin words are “In Illo uno unum”. These words come from a sermon of St. Augustine (Enarrationes Psalm 127), and are an abbreviation of Augustine’s affirmation: NOS MULTI IN ILLO UNO UNUM, “though we Christians are many, in the one Christ we are one.” Bishop Prevost chose this motto as an indication that the bishop is called to promote authentic unity among all people, and that this unity can only be brought about when we have communion in Christ.

The remaining symbols in the coat of arms include the green ecclesiastical hat and the six tassels in three rows on either side of the shield (the heraldic insignia of a bishop), and a gold processional cross that is seen extending above and below the shield, indicating that it is the cross of Christ that all Christians are called to take up and to carry as we go forward in life.

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